CURRENCY
中文版

Date

Local Time

Home | Sabah | Wiki
Print

Kinabalu Park Botanical Gardens

PITCHER PLANT (Nepenthes gracilis)
PITCHER PLANT (Nepenthes gracilis)

PITCHER PLANT (Nepenthes gracilis)

The pitcher plant is a carnivorous reptile that lives around Malaysia especially in North Borneo. Pitcher Plant trees usually grow in acidic soil. Pitcher Plant Trees are carnivorous plants that trap insects in the pot to provide some of the needed nitrogen. Nepenthes began as a rosette and mature trees as tree climbing tendrils (tendril Climbers). Some suckers forming a hollow pot.

Different species have a pot shape and different colors. Most species grow on the ground, while some othersare epiphytes (epiphytic).

BAMBOO (Kinabaluchloa Nebulosa)
BAMBOO (Kinabaluchloa Nebulosa)

BAMBOO (Kinabaluchloa Nebulosa)

Bamboos are of great importance. They are used so intensively for such a wide range of purposes as well as a food source of its edible shoot. Bamboos growth is differ from 30 cm to almost 30 m in height as the tallest plant of the members of the grass family, Poaceae. Estimated a between 800 - 1000 species in 49 - 59 genera in the world, of which, 35 species belong to 19 genera found in Sabah and all the species can be found within the vicinity of Kinabalu Park.

They occur at low to medium elevation, growing wild or are naturalized or cultivated in a great variety of habits. Bamboo stalks form two basic types of rhizome such as sympodium (forming rhizome) and monopodium (individual rhizome). This segmented plant, while looking like a tree, is simply a fast growing, some species grow 1 m ( 3 ft ) in 24 hours. The culms have a multipurpose uses.

WILD BANANA (Musa Monticula)
WILD BANANA (Musa Monticula)

WILD BANANA (Musa Monticula)

This is the banana family ( Musaceace ), comprising of many species or varieties of cultivated and wild bananas belonging to the genus Musa. The wild plants are the largest of the herbaceous flowering plants. Bananas are quick to colonies landslips and gaps, particularly in the alluvial soil along the riverside. Their flower is important nectar sources, especially for nectarevorous birds, bats and insects. Their fruit are eaten and the seeds consequently dispersed by squirrels, rats, civets and fruit bats. The rolled leaf of the banana as it begins to open is the favored roost site of whiskered bats and, once fully expanded, also provides shelter for the small fruit bats.

Accumulated litter around the base of the culms is important invertebrate habitat. The matured leaf can be used for food wrap as well as its internal young cabbage and flower can be cooked for vegetable. Five species are found in Kinabalu Park growing between sea level and low montane forest (1700 m alt).

PRAYER PLANT (Phcelophrynium Maximum)
PRAYER PLANT (Phcelophrynium Maximum)

PRAYER PLANT (Phcelophrynium Maximum)

This plant are belonging to the Marantaceae family of the ginger order (Zingiberales), are distinctive ecologically in being best developed in tropical climate. At present, 550 species in 31 genera were known worldwide of which 450 species known to occur in South America and 100 species of Rhizomatous perennial herbs that are native to moist or swampy tropical forests, particularly in the America but also in Africa and Asia. In Sabah, 4 genera comprised of 13 species have been recorded and most of the species can be found growing mainly in the lowland. As you see in front as Phcelophrynium Maximum one of the species that vary from plants with slender, reed like stalks to leafy spreading herbs to dense bushes nearly 2 m high.

The leaf sheath has a multipurpose use such as for wrapping food or thatching for roof of simple house. The sylinder leaf stalk can be thinning for making handicrafts.

AROIDS/ WILD (Alocasia Princeps)
AROIDS/ WILD (Alocasia Princeps)

AROIDS/ WILD (Alocasia Princeps)

There are 3500 species belong to 110 genera of aroids restricted to the tropics, of which 317 species (259 endemic) in 31 genera have been officially recorded for Borneo as their Old World enclave. Currently, 47 species in 22 species have been listed for Kinabalu Park that live and breed in torrents, streams and ponds, on cliffs and rocks, high on trees trapping their own compost, in ditches, tidal mud, swamps and wasteland, and through the forest they are everyway on the floor and vanishing upwards clinging to trees boles.

Ten species can be found in the garden including some replanted and growing locally. Many species of this group are locally used as traditional remedies and some they have to cook for favourite dishes.

RATTANS (Plectocomia Elongata)
RATTANS (Plectocomia Elongata)

RATTANS (Plectocomia Elongata)

This plant are spiny climbing palms belonging to the Lepidocaryoid major group of the palm family (Aricaceae). There are twelve recognized genera comprising 600 species concentrated in South East Asia, however not all this 600 species are climbing plants. The rattan genera formed in different size and shape. Many species are ethno botanically significant, as a source of cane for basketry, binding, cordage and a wealth of other purposes. The rattans are particularly prominent among the lowland palms.

More than 40 species found within the vicinity of Kinabalu Park, with more than half of the species of Calamus, three - fourths of Daemonorops and all of Korthalsia, Plectocomia and Plectocomiopsis lowland species, some of which may also occur at higher elevation.The largest of the mountain rattans is Plectocomia Elongata (as you see in front), its huge leaves, often 5 or more metres long bear leaflets in groups.

PINK MAIDEN (Medinilla Speciosa)
PINK MAIDEN (Medinilla Speciosa)

PINK MAIDEN (Medinilla Speciosa)

This particular species is one of the 17 species of the genus can be found in Kinabalu Park. A small tree known occuring in wide range of altitudes and forest types from the lowland forest to montane forest. Leaves ovate with tapering apex, base prominently heart-shaped and sessile (without a leaf stalk), veins 5 to 7. Inflorescense hanging (as you can see), young fruits pink in color and turned into dark blue when ripe, edible with sweet taste. Bearing fruits in all year round as a foods source for fruit eater wild animals.

Local belief that consuming a fresh mature fruit will prevent one from contracting eye diseases and a poultice of the leaves with turmeric is applied to the forehead for headache.

TREE FERN
TREE FERN

TREE FERN

Large tree fern Cyathea Contaminans (Cyatheaceae) is widely distributed in the Malesian region. Tree fern of this kind occur from 500 m up to about 1600 m above sea level. Other species appear, mostly of smaller stature. In all, 22 species of tree ferns of the genus Cyathea have been recorded within Kinabalu Park area and six species were known endemic.

All have a more or less persistent mass of scales protecting the young fronds are important for distinguishing the species.

FIG
FIG

FIG

About 83 species of fig plants are family of Moraceae the entire one genus, Ficus found in entirely Kinabalu Park distributed widely from the lowland (Six species of which can be found in the garden). It grows different characteristic and size, may be large or small trees, bushes, scrambling climbers, creepers or epiphytes inhabit both primary and secondary forest.

Fig trees produce large crops with variable periodicities provide vital food sources for frugivorous animals, especially bird and mammals. The animals, in turn, play and essential role in seed dispersal.

ORCHID (Bulbophyllum Lobbii)
ORCHID (Bulbophyllum Lobbii)

ORCHID (Bulbophyllum Lobbii)

The orchids an estimated 15,000 to 30,000 species occurs worldwide from the hottest lowland tropics to the arctic tundra, but of course they are far more abundant in the tropics region, generally considered to be a primitive feature. Of which 887 species in 121 genera were officially recorded from Kinabalu Park (102 species endemic) and 400 species of the number can be found in the garden. Orchid flowers are differentiated from those of other flowering plants by having one petal modified to form an elongated lip, or labellum. In pollination they have some of the most specialized mechanisms found in any plants, deceiving and even trapping insects that transfer their pollen.

Many of them produce vast quantities of dust-like seeds in a single fruits which are dispersed by wind and insects.

KEROSENE TREE (Pittosporum Resiniferum)
KEROSENE TREE (Pittosporum Resiniferum)

KEROSENE TREE (Pittosporum Resiniferum)

There are 4 species of this tree can be found occuring in the Kinabalu Park. Most of the species are known as pioneer trees which distribute from the lowland up to low montane forest between 400 and 2300 m of altitude. Most of the species are relatively small tree least than 10 m high. Kerosene Tree is a unique features as its produce strong lemony smell like resin from the plagged fruits is inflammable.

The olive color of it young fruits will than turned into orange when ripe and its capsules like twin husk open to show up its blackish tiny seeds which attracts the attention to many fruits eater birds before it drop on the ground.

RHODODENDRON
RHODODENDRON

RHODODENDRON

This plant is belong to the Ericaceae family are distinctive ecologically in being best developed in cool, moist, acid situations. Thus the Rhododendrons are most common on the mountain, being rare in the lowland. About 900 species worldwide of which about one third occur in South-east Asia. Borneo is the second richest island with about 50 species described. Of which, 43 including 13 endemic have been recorded between 1000 and 4090 m altitude from Kinabalu Park all belong in section Vireya, the predominant group in South-east Asia, which are characterized by their long-tailed seeds.

Its distribution are limited mainly at high altitude between a minimum of six species should be seen in blooming by a careful observer climbing from Park Headquarters to the summit of Mount Kinabalu.

MOSSES and LIVERWORTS (Bryophytes)
MOSSES and LIVERWORTS (Bryophytes)

MOSSES and LIVERWORTS (Bryophytes)

This plant is one of the most characteristic plants of the tropical rainforest. The estimated number of 15,000 species in the world, about 5000 are found in tropical rain forest. High species diversity, different reproductive strategies and various morphological adaptations, enable bryophytes to establish themselves in all kinds of habitats. In the tropical forest, mosses and liverworts cover nearly all available substrates.

They act as the “sponge” of the rainforest, to prevent rainwater or run-off from disappearing too quickly. Scientists have found that many bryophytes are very sensitive to changes in the ecosystem and used them as indicators for air and water pollution. At least 500 species can be found in entirely Kinabalu Park.

BIRD'S NEST FERNS (Asplenium Nidus)
BIRD'S NEST FERNS (Asplenium Nidus)

BIRD'S NEST FERNS (Asplenium Nidus)

The closed canopy creates a microclimate on lower layers, which are cool, dark and often full of mist. Shade loving plants such as ferns, thrive in this environment. Many ferns are terrestrial, others are climbers and others love above the ground rooted on the bark of trees. One of the most recognizable ferns is the bird’s nest fern, one of the 621 species belong to 128 genera were officially recorded within the park boundary.

It can be seen growing on the trunks or branches of trees. The shape of the fern traps water, falling leaves, flowers and other treev debris. As the material decomposes, it provides essential nutrients to the plants, such as orchids growing inside in the fern “nest”. Most of the ferns species are found growing abundantly at the middle slope of the mountain.

CURCULIN (Curculigo Latifolia)
CURCULIN (Curculigo Latifolia)

CURCULIN (Curculigo Latifolia)

Members are monocotyledons comprising of herbs with tuberous rhizomes. Plant stemless bearing spirally arranged long and lanceolate leaves with parallel veins. Flowers born in the axils of leaves, star-shaped, bright yellow. Fruits roundish or cylindrical, edible with sweet taste. Curculin is a sweet protein that was discovered and isolatedin 1990 from the fruit of Curculigo Latifolia, a plant from Malaysia. Like miraculin, curculin exhibits taste-modifying activity; however, unlike miraculin, it also exhibits a sweet taste by itself. After consumption of curculin, water and sour solutions taste sweet. This family is represented by two species of Curculigo that can see growing in the garden.

Fibres from the leaf blades are used for weaving textile. Mature leaves and lower surfaces of the lamina are scraped with a bamboo blade to remove the outer skin or epidermis, thereby exposing the thread - like white fibres. The fibers are collected and can be dyed black with sap from the fruits of the mengkudu ( local name ) ( Morinda Citrifolia, Rubiaceae ), or red with sap from the fruits of the Engkerebai ( local name ) ( Psychotria Viridiflora Rubiaceae).

 

How to book your tour?

3 Simple Steps. That’s All You Need :

Step 1: Choose your tour
Step 2: Email or Call us to confirm
Step 3: Make payment via online secured credit card

Have questions?
Need advice?

Click here to go to our general FAQ

Call us at +(6) 088 448409

Email us at [email protected]

Want customised tour?

Our friendly Borneo tour consultants can help

Customize your tour package.
Get a FREE no obligation tour quotation.

Contact us today!

^ Back to Top